Society for Endocrinology - a world-leading authority on hormones

Events

Webinar Topics

Clinical Skills Webinars will be taking place monthly, available free to Society members who register and attend the live Webinar, or by streaming the session on demand in the Members' Area.

If you are not a member of the Society and wish to access the webinar series, you can apply for membership by visiting the membership page.

For information on how to access the webinars please visit the registration page.

The topics to be covered are:

Dr Miles Levy (Leicester) & Professor Mark Sherlock (Dublin, Ireland)

Session overview:

  • Introduction & What’s new in D.I?
  • Pitfalls in diagnosis of D.I
  • Nuances of DI Management
  • How to approach Adipsic DI
  • Acute aspects of DI Management

Stream-on-demand the first webinar within the Members' Area.

Speaker biography:

Dr Miles  Levy, Consultant Endocrinologist, University Hospitals of Leicester. Dr Levy was appointed Consultant Endocrinologist at University Hospitals of Leicester in 2005 and is currently an Honorary Associate Professor at Leicester University. Dr Levy's research interests include the genetics of endocrine tumours, functional imaging in endocrine tumours and the association of pituitary tumours and headache. Miles is the CRG Lead Endocrinology for Midlands and East, and Training Programme Director for Diabetes and Endocrinology East Midlands South. Dr Levy has an active role within the Society is currently a member of both the Clinical Committee and Public Engagement Committee, a Media Advisor for the Society and he is also Editor in Chief for You and Your Hormones, the Society’s public-facing website. He co-writes the endocrinology chapter for Kumar & Clarke and Endocrinology at a Glance and is the education Lead for Endocrinology at Leicester Medical School.

Professor Mark Sherlock graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland in 2000. He received his specialist endocrine training initially in Beaumont Hospital.  Following this, he received specialist training in Endocrinology in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham and the University of Birmingham, where he spent five years. He received his MD thesis for studies related to morbidity and mortality in patients with acromegaly. He obtained his PhD thesis from the University of Birmingham for studies relating to cortisol metabolism in muscle and in patients receiving hydrocortisone therapy. Professor Sherlock’s main clinical and research interests are in all areas of pituitary and adrenal disease and salt and water homeostasis.

 

Dr John Ayuk (Birmingham), Professor William Drake (London) & Professor Mark Sherlock (Dublin, Ireland)

Session 1 with Professor Mark Sherlock: Morbidity and mortality in acromegaly

Session 2 with Professor William Drake: Acromegaly; large difficult tumours

Session 3 with Dr John Ayuk: Radiotherapy in the management of acromegaly - the good, the bad, and the not so ugly?

Stream-on-demand the second webinar within the Members' Area.

John Ayuk is a Consultant Endocrinologist at University Hospitals Birmingham. He trained in Endocrinology in the West Midlands, completing a Research Fellowship in Endocrinology and being awarded an MD at the University of Birmingham. His clinical and research interests include the pathogenesis, management and outcome of endocrine tumours. He is the author of a number of papers that have influenced changes in the way pituitary disease is managed, and as a result, is regularly involved in writing consensus guidelines. He also holds the post of Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham and is the Chair of the UK Acromegaly Register Steering Committee. 

Professor Drake trained at the University of Oxford and the Royal London Hospital Medical College. After junior medical jobs in London and in Cape Town, South Africa, he returned to the UK to specialise in Endocrinology at St Bartholomew’s Hospital. Following a 12 month medicine and endocrinology fellowship in Vancouver, Canada, he returned to the UK and is now a Consultant Physician/Professor of Clinical Endocrinology at St Bartholomew’s Hospital.

Professor Mark Sherlock graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland in 2000. He received his specialist endocrine training initially in Beaumont Hospital. Following this, he received specialist training in Endocrinology in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham and the University of Birmingham, where he spent five years. He received his MD thesis for studies related to morbidity and mortality in patients with acromegaly.  He obtained his PhD thesis from the University of Birmingham for studies relating to cortisol metabolism in muscle and in patients receiving hydrocortisone therapy. Professor Sherlock’s main clinical and research interests are in all areas of pituitary and adrenal disease and salt and water homeostasis.

Dr Niki Karavitaki (Birmingham) & Dr Robert Murray (Leeds).

Session 1: Prolactinoma Background

Session 2: Prolactinoma – Dopamine Agonist Withdrawal

Session 3: Giant Prolactinomas

Session 4: Prolactinoma – Dopamine Agonist Adverse Effects

Session 5: Dopamine Agonist Resistance

Stream-on-demand the third webinar within the Members' Area.

Dr Niki Karavitaki, MSc, PhD, FRCP Senior Clinical Lecturer in Endocrinology and Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist. Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research (IMSR), College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham; Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust; Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, UK

Niki Karavitaki is Senior Clinical Lecturer (University of Birmingham) and Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist (University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust). She leads the academic Pituitary Theme at the Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research (University of Birmingham) and she is the co-lead of the Pituitary Service at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham.

Her clinical and research interests focus on pituitary tumours and hypopituitarism and she has published extensively on the field. She has active involvement in national and international committees and she was the Chair of the Programme Organising Committee of the European Neuroendocrine Association 2020 Congress. 

Dr Robert Murray is a Consultant Endocrinologist & Honorary Associate Professor at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, having been appointed in 2004. His subspecialty interests, both clinically and research, lie in pituitary disease, late-endocrine effects of cancer, and optimising hormone replacement therapies.

Dr Murray is active in producing research data to improve our knowledge and treatment of patients with pituitary disease. Dr Murray is an active member of the Society for Endocrinology (SfE) Clinical Committee (2010-13 & 2018-date), Public Engagement Committee (2018-date) and medical board of the Pituitary Foundation. He has previously served on the RCP Joint Specialty Committee for Diabetes and Endocrinology (2005-10), SfE Nurses Committee (2010-13), and SfE Corporate Liasion Committee (2010-13). Dr Murray is on the Editorial boards of the journals ‘Pituitary’, ‘Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism’ and ‘Advances in Therapy’. Locally Dr Murray has been very involved with education serving as TPD for West Yorkshire Diabetes & Endocrinology specialist training (2015-19).

Professor Simon Pearce (Newcastle-upon-Tyne) & Professor Kristien Boelaert (Birmingham)

SESSION OVERVIEW TO FOLLOW

Dr Michael O'Reilly (Dublin, Ireland) & Professor Mark Gurnell (Cambridge)

SESSION OVERVIEW TO FOLLOW

Mark Gurnell is Professor of Clinical Endocrinology in Cambridge, where he is Clinical Lead for Endocrine Services. He is SubDean in the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine and Head of Undergraduate Assessment. His clinical and research interests are focussed on the pituitary, adrenal and thyroid disorders, with particular interests in:

  • acromegaly
  • Cushing’s disease
  • TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas
  • secondary adrenal insufficiency
  • primary aldosteronism

He is head of the Cambridge Endocrine Molecular Imaging Group (CEMIG) and has led the development of novel PET tracers for imaging pituitary adenomas and adrenocortical tumours, with several now in use in routine clinical practice. He is recognised as an expert in the management of patients with unusual thyroid function tests. He currently serves on various expert committees/panels, including:

  • Council of the UK Society for Endocrinology (Treasurer)
  • Education Committee of the European Society of Endocrinology
  • US Endocrine Society’s ESAP panel
  • Royal College of Physicians (UK) Specialty Certificate Examinations Board (Endocrinology & Diabetes)

He holds a number of senior appointments in medical education and chairs the Board of the UK Medical Schools Council Assessment Alliance. He leads the team of UK Assessment experts developing the forthcoming UK Medical Licensing Assessment (MLA) Applied Knowledge Test (AKT).

Dr O’Reilly is a Consultant Endocrinologist in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, and Clinical Associate Professor at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). He is an honours graduate of the National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG, 2005). His Clinical PhD fellowship into androgen metabolism was funded by the Wellcome Trust from 2012 to 2015 at the University of Birmingham. Upon completion of his PhD and clinical specialist training, he was appointed as a Clinician Scientist at the University of Birmingham and Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist, University Hospital Birmingham, from 2015-2019.  He led the Adrenal MDT and established a nurse-led Andrology service at the hospital. Dr P'Reilly is the recipient of numerous national and international awards for his research and is regularly invited to speak on adrenal disease, reproductive endocrinology and androgen excess. Dr O’Reilly returned to a consultant post in Beaumont Hospital Dublin in 2019, and in 2020 received a prestigious Emerging Clinician Scientist Fellowship from the Health Research Board, funding his research into the role of adrenal androgens in health complications in women.

 

Dr Richard Quinton (Newcastle-upon-Tyne) & Dr Channa Jayasena (London)

SESSION OVERVIEW TO FOLLOW

Speaker biographies:

Dr Channa Jayasena is a Reader and Consultant in Reproductive Endocrinology and Andrology at Imperial College and Hammersmith Hospital, London. Dr Jayasena qualified in medicine at Cambridge University, after which he undertook specialist training in Endocrinology and Diabetes in London. He performed research at Imperial College as a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Training Fellow and subsequently NIHR Clinical Lecturer. Dr Jayasena has national expertise in the treatment of reproductive disorders. He is currently Clinical Lead for Male Infertility / Andrology at Hammersmith Hospital.

Dr Richard Quinton has been a Consultant Endocrinologist at the Royal Victoria Infirmary and Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University since 1999. Dr Quinton graduated from Cambridge University in 1988. Whilst following core medical training at St Bartholomew’s Hospital London and Erasmus University Hospital Rotterdam he gained his CCST. He has published nearly 200 articles, including several in NEJM, JCI, PNAS & BMJ. As well as collaborating with molecular geneticists to identify key genes involved in the neuroendocrine control of human reproduction, his emphasis on careful patient phenotyping and longitudinal follow-up has resulted in novel clinical observations that have changed perceptions of the plasticity of the human GnRH pulse-generator and its resilience in the face of both genetic and environmental insults.
He has long been an active supporter of patient involvement and self-help groups, including those for Kallmann, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes, and was a founder member (currently Vice Chair) of the “GNRH Network” of clinicians, researchers, educators and patients, funded by the EU as part of its Cooperation in Science & Technology programme, which re-shaped directions of travel for collaborative research, patient education and patient access to best care across Europe in the field of central hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.